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environment. we may find ourselves in a different in varmint in which they will have less choice. the actuarial estimates are that the fha books of business will more than pay for themselves. what we're looking for them to do is pay for the losses we incurred when we were playing a counter-cyclical role. the phrase i always use, it is inherent to an insurance model. fha does it for a public purpose. there is a point at which -- i have had plenty of economists argue that it is not rational for us to charge today's home buyers more than it costs us to pay for the losses of the past. we had a large, traumatic, national emergency. think of it as the hurricane sandy or hurricane katrina of the housing market. maybe the public sector ought to say -- the economists say we should write the check for the treasury and we should go back to starting the future homebuyers at a price that is rational. the financing mechanism and the like. i think we should do that, with there are limits to how far you can do that. there are limits to what you can do with the pricing. when the private market co
me go into an environment and go doubling around and that, find out that i sort of like honey boo boo, that is a huge part of the american television experience and it gets sold short when you get techno is t-- ecstatic. a lot of americans love the enjoyment of escaping passivity and be able to roam around the tv jungle of finding things it did not know were there. >> michael powell on the future of television, monday night at 8:00 eastern on "the communicators." >> tomorrow, join us for reform and how education and innovation can benefit the u.s. economy. speakers include gene sperling, harvard university president, and former congresswoman and portugal vice-president, susan molinari. - google vice-president, susan molinari. from the american enterprise institute, join us live, 5:30 p.m. eastern also here on c- span. president obama troubles monday to an auto plant in michigan to merge congress to extend tax breaks for 998% of americans.
on both environment and genetics. we have established large networks to collect data and conduct powerful analyses. those networks explore possible causative factors in the environment before, during and after pregnancy. one of these networks published a study that suggests prenatal and early life exposure to car emissions is a factor. in 2012, congress appropriated over $47 million for autism and other developmental disorders. this supports 43 training programs through 41 states and projects for underserved populations. federal agencies also use public-private partnerships to maximize our, such as the nih national data office of research that has an autism depository. this brings together hundreds of researchers and clinicians with tens of thousands of people nationwide affected by asd. there is a call center, web based -- the nih supported the association in the early prevention of autism. in conclusion, since the establishment, wide expertise has come to bear on autism with research rapidly translating into individuals and the community. coordinated efforts to identify best practices t
us about. host: thank you for the call. speaking along the lines of the environment and the epa. there is this -- from "to the boston globe" -- this from "the l.a. times" -- from "the gazette" in colorado -- our question for you is, what the think the president's no. 1 priority should be? just is joining us on the democrat line. caller: good morning. it was a little bit of serendipity that you read the editorial from "the new york times." i believe the first priority, our entire government should be repairing the infrastructure of the country. we have some infrastructure from the 19th century. with what just happened in new york, i really do think that our treasure and our people -- repairing the infrastructure will create jobs. we also have to begin protecting our coastal communities from the mega storms. even if we just decided right now to work against climate change or to slow down climate change, it still is going to happen. it will happen. it is a mechanism that is not going to stop even if we were to stop pumping co2 into the atmosphere. we have to prepare and work to tha
by the fact that we are a low interest-rate environment? >> we have not finished those calculations. we are in the midst of doing that for the budget. they are both large effects. we simply do not have an answer to that. >> it is a large effect that comes from the difference in interest rates. you know the low interest-rate environment customs? >> let me ask my team behind me to get that. we will have that for you in a moment. >> my guess is i am not sure that assumption is as low as the rate is today with an interest-rate of 1.6%, it is shockingly low. we have a fed insisting it will keep this way. i will be interested to see what the net effect of this interest rate is. >> there is an artificiality of the point in time because it presumes every one of the payoffs, we have no revenue to fha, where we know there is a large revenue -- >> there is a flaw in the model? >> no. congress requires the review is done in a runoff scenario. we also looked at, what if we keep doing business, so we have those projections. that is not the 2% calculation. it is something we could give you more detail
, that the value of doing it now in a low interest rate environment is substantially larger on these new loans for two reasons. the lower the interest rate, the faster the am more at thisization of the principal and therefore this will be a more valuable change. second because these loans are so low interest rate, they will be on our books far larger. frankly, not many loans in the past have hit that limit. so even though it's $1 trillion portfolio, the value of that change is quite small for the old loans. it's really going to be quite valuable for these newer very low interest rate loans. >> i'll be briefly two more questions. i see that f.h.a. is now making loans to people who three years ago were foreclosed upon. and that's a very different standard than even exists at fannie and freddie. i don't understand. why are you doing that? >> this is another area where we are working on changes. here's the issue. we have a significant number of homeowners that were responsible homeowners, had good credit scores that lost their jobs in the biggest economic crisis this country has faced since the de
to implement. i will say, however, that the value of doing it now in a low interest rate environment is substantially larger on these new loans for two reasons. the lower the interest rate, the faster the amortization of the principal and therefore this will be a more valuable change. second because these loans are so low interest rate, they will be on our books far larger. frankly, not many loans in the past have hit that limit. so even though it's $1 trillion portfolio, the value of that change is quite small for the old loans. it's really going to be quite valuable for these newer very low interest rate loans. >> i'll be briefly two more questions. i see that f.h.a. is now making loans to people who three years ago were foreclosed upon. and that's a very different standard than even exists at fannie and freddie. i don't understand. why are you doing that? >> this is another area where we are working on changes. here's the issue. we have a significant number of homeowners that were responsible homeowners, had good credit scores that lost their jobs in the biggest economic crisis th
will say, however, that the value of doing it now in a low interest rate environment is larger on these new loans for two reasons. the lower the interest rate, the faster the amortization of the principal. therefore, this will be a more valuable change. second, because these loans are so low interest rate, they will be on our books far longer. not many loans in the past have hit that limit. even though it is $1 trillion, the value of the change is small for the old loans. it is going to be valuable for these newer, very low interest rate loans. >> briefly two more questions. i see that f.h.a. is now making loans to people who three years ago were foreclosed upon. and that is a very different standard than even exists at fannie and freddie. why are you doing that? put this is another area where we are working on changes. responsible hone owners got good credit scores that lost their jobs. we believe somebody can show that they are back to work and a responsible borer again. that is someone we would work with. i would agree that our standards are not clear enough in dividing those. so what we
and the ability to work with others in a competitive environment is a huge life skill. competitive sports and the extraordinary game of american football. >> what do you want for christmas? >> at least an 8-8 record by the dolphins. i know i should aim higher. >> mrs. rubio, happy birthday. we appreciate you being here. thank you for being here and thankful to the bank of america. and thank you for coming out early. senator rubio for a fantastic conversation. [applause] captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> president obama addressed a group of corporate executives today in washington. he talked about negotiations with congressional republicans on deficit reduction and the so-called fiscal cliff. >> the holdup right now is that speaker boehner took a position -- i think the day after the campaign -- that said we're willing to bring in revenue, but we aren't willing to increase rates. and i just explained to you why we don't think that works. we're not trying to -- we're not insisting on rates just out of spite or
an environment in which we can care for the elderly. >> the think americans will remain optimistic but this did of the economy? if we have not tackle the things we have just talked about like the cost of education, the housing market? we are figuring out some philosophical issues about taxing and funding? >> i think the economy has been growing slowly and steadily all in the absence of any movement, which we have seen over the test of the last year. i have worked on guantanamo for the past 10 years. my sense is that if there is some movement until the positive direction, which have not seen out of washington and enter a long time, -- in a long time, at least we will not see head winds. we are making some progress. i see that continue. >> i want to come back to what todd said earlier. i am concerned about confidence being fragile. todd reference what happened until august of 2011. we saw in limited to lie confidence tank. market confidence grew jog with some of the market confidence plunged. i think we have to be concerned -- market confidence plunged. if we look like we are not grappling with t
. the environmental community can see a reduction in the amount of carbon and an improvement in the environment as well as conservatives can see the idea of leaving it more resources at home and sending less of our wealth abroad. this is a way of doing something different, which is creating a consensus to get something done in the next congress. we are excited for the next congress and to work with all legislators to implement these recommendations and see them through to their felon. i would like to call fred smith, the chairman and founder of fedex. he really needs no introduction. but the truth is fedex and what it is done in our economy is groundbreaking. they are the clipper ships of the modern age. what they see in terms of the economic growth of our country, because they touch every industry, as well as providing the transportation to making our economy grow, i think he is well-suited to discuss this issue. i thank him for being the co- chair since 2006 and joining with general kelley and myself to do this. thank you. >> thank you. i became involved in the council out of self-interest. b
. >> that was the process in 1986. can that happen this day? >> it feels like a different environment. i do not know, but right now we are in the middle of a political test of wills on marginal tax rates. it is interesting we're not fighting on the underlying principle, which is that wealthy ought to pay more in order to help us close debts and deficits, get our economy back on track. right now the president thinks he won a point, was vindicated by his victory in the election, and republicans did not want to do that, but he has the hand in this struggle. restoring the clinton tax rates is something i would support. we supported them back in 1991 when bill clinton was running for president. no problem on that. it is a reasonable adjustment, but may not be sufficient to reach the targets we need and it does not help us in bipartisan bargaining, reaching a deal. i hope as this negotiation -- we ought to be at the irish times -- that they will not make a fetish of marginal tax rates street if they should go up some, but do they need to go back where they work? i do not know. lots of ways to increase tax
economic growth. regulation is necessary to protest at -- to protect our environment and keep our food safe. but regulations cost money to follow. the more expensive a regulation, the less money a business has to give raises or hire new people. we need to have a balanced approach to regulation. we need to weigh the benefit of any given regulation against the impact it will have on job creation. that is why we should implement something like senator paul's act, so that congress that's the final say on it. -- gets the final say on it. [applause] getting control of our debt. it is critically important. it is not enough. we need to do more. we should expand our domestic energy industry. american innovation has given us access to massive new deposits of oil and natural gas, making america one of the most energy- rich countries on the planet. this new energy opens all kinds of new middle-class jobs come from the fields and platforms woodrow, to the manufacturing plants that return to the united states with a lower cost of energy, and these are the types of jobs we need most, right now. middle-cla
by the american people and your businesses and economic environment worldwide. through that. john engler -- he and i philosophically don't agree on much -- \[laughter] >> i'm just being honest about john, he is a great politician and comes from the other party, but john is exactly right when he says that the only thing that debt ceiling for is to destroy your credit rating. so i want to send a very clear message to people here. we are not going to play that game next year. if congress in any way suggests that they are going to tie negotiations to debt ceiling votes and take us to the brink of default once again as part of a budget negotiation, which by the way, we have never done in our history until we did it last year, i will not play that game. we have to break that habit before it starts. so, with that, let me just say, we have one path where we resolve it fairly quickly. cuts. we reform our entitlements. increases. you get business certainty and you do what you do best, innovate, hire workers, make profits, do well by your shareholders and grow america and we have open-running room next y
is the honorable sherman, under secretary for natural resources and environment at the u.s. department of agriculture. he has a holiday message to share with you as well. [applause] >> speaker boehner, senators udall and bennett, congressman tipton and distinguished guests, on behalf of the secretary, tom vilsack and our chief of the forest service, i would like to say a few words if i can. each year, the capitol christmas tree comes from the u.s. forest service, which is an agency within usda and eachier we -- each year we select that tree from a different forest. this tree is from a small town called meeker, colorado in the white river national forest in the high mountain areas of colorado. and it's a spruce tree and 73 feet tall and happens to be 74 years old. it's only the third time in colorado's history that colorado has provided the capitol christmas tree and i'm particularly proud of that since i'm a colorado resident. yay, colorado! [cheers and applause] >> we call this the people's tree for good reason and that's because it comes from our public lands, which are owned by all
what the traffic will bear, but the political environment, the culture on the hill will accommodate. >> dave camp and sander levin cut a deal? >> begin the process and try to confer. if there is a new revenue source, carbon tax, some sort of consumption tax, it will emerge out of their common frustration that they cannot get where they need to go. what we need to do is do not micromanage, don't be prescriptive. give them a number, a ratio of expenditure reductions to tax reform, revenue enhancements, and if that task falls to the -- and give them that task this fall to the committee and over the next six or nine months, task them to meet those numbers. i think the capability is there to do it. it may not be rostenkowski and packwood, but if there is a will, they will get the job done. >> i do not think it is credible to kick the can down the road that far at this point. i think the reaction in the real economy would be devastating. you have to imagine what you are suggesting, vic, which is a good suggestion in the context of doing something now and whether that something is betting
and take. in that environment, commonplace is essential. it -- if you go through the last campaign, it is not that big of an area. compromise is required. give-and-take -- people have to accept some things they do not like as part of a larger agreement. i would say getting a comprehensive agreement now that resolve's many of these issues would at least reduce the constant threat of government shutdown. that is why this is so important going forward. >> i would remind everybody we have threats of government shut down in the past -- the famous showdown with newt gingrich and clinton. when you have divided government, you have clashes of major philosophical difference. the key is being able to have an element of compromise as part of that process. that is exactly the place we are in right now, trying to find that point. >> the best model for all of you who are working so hard on this may well be speilberg's movie about lincoln. lincoln made deals. you know what, he achieved great, great goals. it goes to the point you are making -- politicians are supposed to play politics, that is no
for the environment. we have to be able to spend the money, 7%. 2.5 years after stimulus we only had $67 billion. 35% was still sitting in washington. we have to change the law. there's some things express and the government accountability report on the selection of some of these projects. their release this march of 2011. specifically at -- bay released this march of 2011. specifically they said there were concerns about transparency and other issues with it. they cannot verify some of the criteria by which some of these projects were selected. can you cite any improvement in that process? you were citing a number of projects but also criticized by gao for the process. >> we tried to improve our decision making process. we have tried to use the governors as our partners on these projects. receiving proposals from them and from the state's and working with them -- states and working with them. try to improve our process for selecting projects. >> the other most recent report by the inspector general, released just weeks ago, saidmber 11, 2000112, it they raised concerns about the management framewor
and another in control of the house, you are going to have a lot of give and take. in that environment, commonplace is essential. if you go through the last campaign, it is not that big of an area. compromise is required. give-and-take -- people have to accept some things they do not like as part of a larger agreement. i would say getting a comprehensive agreement now that resolves many of these issues would at least reduce the constant threat of government shutdown. that is why this is so important going forward. >> i would remind everybody we have threats of government shutdown in the past -- the famous showdown with newt gingrich and clinton. when you have divided government, you have clashes of major philosophical difference. the key is being able to have an element of compromise as part of that process. that is exactly the place we are in right now, trying to find that point. >> the best model for all of you who are working so hard on this may well be speilberg's movie about lincoln. lincoln made deals. you know what, he achieved great, great goals. it goes to the point you are ma
the carpets are. you can see they are exported to the united states. this is often the production environment. a local product, many people and this carries for hurricane iris lot and into a 2009 wiped out bangladesh. the land of ours came in and said, we will rebuild your home but you have to start selling this work. they get a roof. you can imagine with the impact of that would be. agriculture is another big one. often sizzle contracts. people will go back to between that and bricks. some said, this of voluntary agreements, but as 0 a process of agreement so i did not know if it counts as slavery. stockbroking is another big one that has been going on for generations. this feeds into the construction industry. a 1983 case, somebody brought a claim under the bonded labor that was passed of the tournament in 86, i went to the same month predicted the elector and many of the conditions still exist. the contemporary manifestation of a labor, it has become less a system of lifetime servitude the -- you can find that one. it is less a system about today than it was a in of the past. it is now is
a reduction in the amount of carbon and an improvement in the environment as well as conservatives can see the idea of leaving it more resources at home and sending less of our wealth abroad. this is a way of doing something different, which is creating a consensus to get something done in the next congress. we are excited for the next congress and to work with all legislators to implement these recommendations and see them through to their felon. -- to their fulfillment. i would like to call fred smith, the chairman and founder of fedex. he really needs no introduction. but the truth is fedex and what -- p. burns about 1.5000 gallons of fuel per day -- 1.5 billion gallons of fuel per day. oh, per year. [laughter] why would really be a problem. but the truth is that sex, what they have done in our economy is groundbreaking. they are the clipper ships of the modern age. what they see in terms of the economic growth of our country, because they touch every industry, as well as providing the transportation to making our economy grow, i think he is well-suited to discuss this issue. i thank hi
. have a safe and secure maritime environment, good for the economy, and good for the american people n my estimation this legislation fulfills that obligation. i urge its passage today. just briefly want to thank once gren mr. lobiondo for his in-- once again mr. lobiondo for his incredible work in bringing this legislation to passage. with that i reserve the balance of my time. . the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new jersey. mr. lobiondo: i rise in support of house resolution 825. 825 covers the coast guard through fear 2014, a level that allows the administration's requested military pay increase for fiscal year 2013 and provide for military pay increase for fiscal year 2014 at a level consistent with c.b.o.'s estimate on the rate of inflation. the bill provides funding for the coast guard of levels that will reverse the irresponsible cuts proposed by the obama administration and will ensure the service has what it needs to successful conduct its missions. the legislation includes critical provisions that will have the coast guard and its service members greater parity with
a reduction in the amount of carbon and an improvement in the environment as well as national security hawks conservative can see the idea of producing more in our country, leaving more resources at home and spending less of our wealth abroad. so we see this as a way of not creating a zero sum game but doing something different, which is create ago consensus in order to get something done in the next congress. and so we're excited for the next congress. we're excited to work with all legislators and the administration to implement these recommendations and see it through to their fulfillment. right now i'd like to call mr. smith, fred smith, who's the championship, c.e.o., president and founder of fedex. he needs to introduction. he burns about 1.5 billion gallons of fuel a day -- a year, sorry. [laughter] that would really be a problem. but the truth is, you know, the fedex and what it's done in our economy is groundbreaking. they are the clipper ships of the modern age, and what they see both in terms of the economic growth of our country, you know, because they touch every industry, as we
have to reduce the debt, we have to reduce taxes, reduce regulation, create an environment in which people can go out and create jobs and hire more workers and then we can lower the unemployment rate and this will not be an issue anymore. host: michael tanner of the cato institute, and michael bivens of the economic policy institute. up next, will continue our "america by the numbers" series. the future of u.s. energy production in 2014. we will be joined by adam sieminski and frank verrastro. >> i think writers institute is something that is very important within the culture. we are a culture of words, of voices. words are key to our imagination, our capacity to invasion -- envision things. we ourselves are not completely tied to print on the page, but there is no other art forms so readily accessible other than perhaps film, which we work with, too. there is something in literature that just captures the human spirit. >> this weekend, joined "book tv" and "american history tv" as we look at the historic and literary life of new york's capital, albany. >> the chiefs of staff had to
manual labor job. we are moving from that manual labor, low-skill jobs environment, to one in which he will have to have more education and skills. that is the reality of globalization, and i do not think you will have to avoid that. where to put more attention to and on getting people the skills -- we have to put more attention and getting people the skills. we will never have thousands of people sitting at sewing machines making t-shirts. host: another area where your groups seemed to disagree is whether the unemployment insurance creates a disincentive to look for work. mr. josh bivens, we start with you on this subject. caller: the two -- guest: the two previous callers identified the root problem -- there are not enough jobs. the ratio is still over three- to-one. if we could wave a magic wand, we would still have a large majority of unemployed workers looking for jobs. that is not a problem of skills. it is not a problem of employers dying to hire, but there are not the people out there. we just do not have the demand for services in the economy. that is like cutting off this sou
, environment and essential services and vulnerable populations with smart planning and well-designed recovery and rebuilding tools. we have the ability to reduce the consequences of severe weather. by mitigating flood risk through smarter land use guidelines, building codes and flood protection improvements. the state of new york has requested $9 billion for mitigation measures from the administration. the state of new jersey is seeking another $7 billion for the same purpose. i commend governor quomeow and governor christie for -- cuomo and governor christie for including strategic needs in their funding request. both of these leaders have demonstrated inble compassion and concern for the people who they represent and have been highly effective in their leadership since the disaster began and it may also include mayor bloomberg, mayor booker and many other local officials that stepped up and did the job they were elected to do. i hope -- i look forward to hearing from our witnesses today. my colleagues who i have the deepest respect for and have been engaged in many conversations with them,
and staff, has worked to develop 21st century learning skills in a classroom environment that fosters creativity, innovation and critical thinking. most importantly, ryan works tirelessly to help his students achieve success in the classroom. ryan devlin, thank you for your commitment to the teaching profession and congratulations. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? >> permission to address the house for one minute, mr. speaker, and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized. >> mr. speaker, members, as announced earlier by congressman ralph hall, we lost a member of the texas legislature, congressman jack brooks, who proudly served his southeast texas district for 42 years after he was first elected in 1952. mr. green: ultimatelying as dean in this house of representatives and dean of our texas delegation. i knew jack brooks from his -- my days in the state legislature and he was one of my mentors when i first came to th
that creates an economic environment that puts them at risk. they immediately move -- if that is table stakes in such terms of taking care of the basis of issues -- in a move to things that have much more meaning to them that focus around jobs, wage growth, getting more disposable income into their household. you see on one level at the abstract level, debt, deficits, fiscal cliff, and then a transition into the to-do list, which is where they would like to see effort. finally, with all of this battering that people have taken during this last few years of difficult economy, we gave voters -- will go to this question in detail -- which gave them a choice, short-term, pragmatic solutions to fix the problem or long-term visionary policies that will put us on the right track interestingly enough, people are thinker -- people are thinking longer term. it is different for different groups, but generally speaking, people are looking for a longer horizon. quickly, the mood of the country, you see the red track, the wrong track. you see it is still 50% believe the country is on the long track, but yo
strike environment, if iran wanted to reconstitute its nuclear program, do we have a problem with nuclear smuggling? >> without outside assistance, iran would not have a large centrifuge program. the death developed a small one overtime, but it depended -- they have developed a small one overtime. they have been smuggling dual- use goods that are necessary to build centrifuges and centrifuge plants since the 1980's. the family will talk about this. -- they freely will talk about this. there are very dependent, and they're active now. there was another court case, and arrested some smugglers yesterday trying to buy things here. carbon fiber. but they were looking for a carbon fiber when the machine. these things are used in missiles, -- winding machine. these things are used in missiles. europe has tightened up. they have been working actively in china to buy european- american-chinese goods. the government is not completed, but they're not doing enough. we're thinking that pressure needs to be brought on china. goods made in germany, sold by that company to the chinese company that thinks
environment to be more conducive to a successful military intervention and to allow the process of force generation to proceed, which does take time to train, equip, and develop a source for its employees. so in a sense we have few choices but to allow those processes to unfold, clearly we're concerned that it takes time to do so but i think we have a sense of moving forward with -- as rapidly as feeze, as rapidly as the circumstances will allow us to do so, recognizing the tremendous leadership that the african partners have already shown both in terms of political dynamics and the initiatives that are supporting this planning process at present. >> thank you. senator isaacson? >> i have just one question. ms. dory. if, as secretary carson said, military discontent with the government support was a major contributing factor to the coup, then the military will be a major contributor -- contributing factor to how successful an election is going to be. in your testimony you say there's a sunogo is in charge of the reform of the military for the interim government. do you know his capabilit
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)